Colm Imbert----use

NEW MEASURE: Finance Minister Colm Imbert

FINANCE Minister Colm Imbert says T&T has received a “favourable” rating from the US credit rating agency Fitch Ratings.

Imbert made the comment during yesterday’s Standing Finance Committee examination of the 2020 budget. In August 2018, Government engaged Fitch to do a rating of the T&T’s economy. At that time, the Ministry of Finance said Fitch would review this country’s sovereign debt ratings, provide an initial/indicative rating and monitored rating of T&T for the period May 1, 2018 to April 30, 2022.

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

FINANCE Minister Colm Imbert will, in due course, be required to explain to the court why in his capacity as chairman of the Joint Select Committee (JSC) on Energy Affairs he, at one point, failed to convene a meeting of the JSC for more than 20 months and whether it was legal to do so.

The Covid-19 pandemic has forced as much as 15 per cent of retail businesses in San Fernando to permanently shut down.

And some small business owners are being forced to make tough decision about reducing staff and adjusting opening hours.

WHILE Nestle saw an increase in demand for its products by households, there was a major decline in products that were sold to hotels and restaurants, which were ordered to be closed amidst the Covid-19 pandemic. Even though restaurants were allowed to reopen their doors on May 11, in-house dining still isn’t allowed and hotels are only allowed outdoor dining for their guests.

SEATED AT tables around the world, she is often the lone woman.

Gender aside, Camille Selvon Abrahams said she brings two other traits to any table—she’s black and Caribbean too.

CANADA’S big five big commercial banks set aside close to C$11 billion in their last quarter in provisions for loans that are not being repaid according to schedule, which is called provisions for credit losses (PCL).

IMPORTANT changes are underway in the pharmaceutical industry. According to Becker’s Hospital Review, for many years pharmaceutical companies have moved away from researching drugs to treat infectious disease, being lured by the potential profits from drugs used to treat non-communicable diseases. Steph Sterling of the Roosevelt Institute points to this ‘failure’ of what she calls the fully market-based system in which new drugs and medical devices are developed.