THE lifespan of a bottle usually ends once its contents have been emptied. But some bottles either have sentimental value or are too beautiful to throw in the trash—so Clive Prevatt of LickaLamp gives them a second life by transforming them into practical pieces of art.

For the past four years LickaLamp has been offering its clients the option of ‘upcycling’ or repurposing bottles by turning them into hand crafted lamps. Their creations which include lamps made from bottles of various shapes and sizes always draw a mixture of reactions ranging from awe and disbelief to curiosity said Prevatt who founded LickaLamp.

“Many are initially puzzled as they try to figure out how they were made. Many also have an ‘Aha!’ moment as they realise what they could do with that special bottle they have been keeping,” he said.

All of LickaLamp’s creations are crafted by hand. They include battery operated or plug-in downlighters, pendant and desk lamps. Most of the bottles sourced by LickaLamp were destined for the landfill, others were on their way to the recycling plant. Now they are beautiful conversation starters.

“In a nod to history, our signature lines are made using some of the Caribbean’s finest rum bottles, but we make our lamps from a wide range of bottles,” said Prevatt. LickaLamp also works on customised orders for persons who are looking for unique gift ideas or are thrilled at the idea of repurposing their favourite bottle which carries sentimental value. Some of the most memorable bottles the company has transformed into lamps include a cognac bottle in the shape of a viking ship, a wine bottle shaped like a bunch of grapes, and a sambuca bottle shaped in the form of a light bulb.

Many of their lamps are made using local teak and other woods, other materials like metal piping are also utilised in the process. Several of their designs also feature vintage edison bulbs.

LickaLamp is a one-man operation. Prevatt does the glass cutting, wood working and electrical aspects of the job. He told Kitcharee that LickaLamp started by accident four years ago. While doing social media marketing for another brand, TriniThingi, a picture of a chandelier made from whiskey bottles popped up in his Pinterest feed.

“That moment of inspiration was followed by a period of extensive online research, prototyping and the eventual development of our own method and design aesthetic,” explained Prevatt.

The smiles and comments from admirers who see the lamps provide him with the motivation to continue, added Prevatt.

LickaLamp can be found online at www.lickalamp.com and www.facebook.com/lickalamp or at Style & Company in Grand Bazaar and The Shop at the Normandie, St Anns.

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