John Lewis

ON THE GROUND: John Lewis, leader of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee, on the ground during an attempted march on state capital from Selma, Alabama, USA, in 1965. –Photo courtesy United Press International

In tribute to the life and legacy of civil rights hero and US Congressman John Lewis, Apple will donate its portion of the proceeds from the documentary John Lewis: Good Trouble to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee, and the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC, USA.

“Representative John Lewis’s life and example compel each of us to continue the fight for racial equity and justice,” said Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives. “This film celebrates his undeniable legacy, and we felt it fitting to support two cultural institutions that continue his mission of educating people everywhere about the ongoing quest for equal rights.”

“The life and legacy of John Lewis, a National Civil Rights Museum Freedom Award recipient, is celebrated throughout the museum,” said Terri Lee Freeman, the National Civil Rights Museum’s president. “This timely contribution will help expand our digital platforms, allowing us to reach many more students, parents, and educators globally, and to continue as a catalyst for positive social change, as Representative Lewis encouraged us all to be. We are grateful to Apple for this incredible gift honouring him.”

“Representative John Lewis was a central leader in helping create the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Because of his pivotal role in American history, he understood the impact a history museum like ours could have on the world,” said Spencer Crew, the National Museum of African American History and Culture’s interim director. “For many years, he was the angel who kept the dream of the museum alive, and he made sure we got the presidential and congressional support needed to open in 2016. As a civil rights leader, he had a vision of what was possible for the nation. He had a similar vision for the museum, which helped make it a reality. Apple’s gift in his honour will help us continue to fulfil our mission.”

Customers can rent John Lewis: Good Trouble on the Apple TV app and explore curated collections that celebrate his legacy in Apple News and on Apple Podcasts.

Customers in the US and Canada can rent John Lewis: Good Trouble at apple.co/-goodtroubledoc on the Apple TV app, which is available on iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, iPod touch, Mac, select Samsung and LG smart TVs, and Amazon Fire TV and Roku devices. In Apple News, customers can explore a special Spotlight collection of curated articles that remember Lewis and celebrate his legacy, as well as listen to a collection of episodes that honour his life from The New York Times, CNN, NPR, and more on Apple Podcasts at apple.co/remembering-john-lewis.

About ‘John Lewis: Good Trouble’

In her intimate account of legendary US Representative John Lewis’s life and legacy, director Dawn Porter takes audiences through his more than 60 years of extraordinary activism—from the bold teenager on the front lines of the civil rights movement to the legislative powerhouse he was throughout his career. After Lewis petitioned Dr Martin Luther King Jr to help integrate a segregated school in his hometown of Troy, Alabama, USA, King sent “the boy from Troy” a roundtrip bus ticket to meet with him.

From that meeting onward, Lewis became one of King’s closest allies. Lewis organised Freedom Rides, which left him bloodied or jailed, and stood at the front lines in the historic marches on Washington and Selma. Lewis continued to protect civil rights as a member of Congress. He never lost the spirit of “the boy from Troy” and had called on his fellow Americans to get into “good trouble” until his passing on July 17, 2020. John Lewis: Good Trouble is a moving tribute to the real-life hero at the forefront of many hard-won battles for lasting change.

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