Robert Moultrie

deserving: Recipients of World Day Of the Boy Child certificates, from left, Robert Moultrie; founder of International Men’s Day, historian Dr Jerome Teelucksingh; Justin Rodriguez; Donald Berment; and Marcus Kissoon pose for a group photo at a ceremony at The UWI, St Augustine campus, recently. The awards were named in honour of Teelucksingh’s father, Rev Daniel Teelucksingh.

“Parents should not impose their values on boys. Allow them to choose and explore their interests for healthy growth and development from boyhood to manhood.”

So said founder of International Men’s Day, The University of the West Indies (The UWI) historian Dr Jerome Teeluck­singh, during a discussion dedicated to the World Day of the Boy Child at his office, Humanities Faculty, The UWI St Augustine campus, recently. World Day of the Boy Child was celebrated on May 16.

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“If you go ah party and you eh hear ‘Meh Lover’ de DJ eh cool. If you doh hear ‘King Liar’ you eh laugh. And if you eh hear ‘We like it’ and ‘Disco Daddy’ you eh party yet!”

Deep, roaring, confident laughter followed that “boasty” declaration from calypso icon Lord Nelson (Robert Nelson) on Friday morning.

JUDGING from the kudos director and producer Willie Singh has received from international film festivals for his short film Temptation, he is well on his way to making a name for himself in the local film industry. Singh was the only Trinidadian filmmaker honoured at last year’s Engage Art Contest where his film won honourable mention. Temptation also made the rounds at 13 international film festivals where it won Most Powerful Film, Best Cinematographer, Best Covid-19 Lockdown Film, Best Visual Effects and Best Religious Short Film.

More than painting pretty colours or placing a random design on canvas, international artist Wilcox Morris intended to make a statement, to express his philosophy, and to “provoke some thought that one should not be complacent at any point in life you may be,” he once said.

IN the 1970s Rupert and Jeanette Cox left Morvant and went to live in the forests between Matelot and Blanchisseuse where they began a social and spiritual revolution. They came to be known as the Earth People. Jeanette became “Mother Earth” and her husband took on the name “Good Shepherd”; they renounced clothing, burnt all their material possessions and roamed the forests naked. They were the subjects of the book Pathology and Identity: The Work of Mother Earth in Trinidad by Roland Littlewood.

Good Lord, I have been through so many troubles, fought so many battles, wondering how I was going to overcome my tragedies... But I learned how to go down on my knees.. And pray... So not I am here today... no longer in misery but on my way to victory...