THE LOST TRIBE

folklore come to life: A model wears a costume for the section Anansi from the Lost Tribe’s 2020

presentation, Anansi. The band will be making a guest appearance at the multiband launch in

November. —Photo: THE LOST TRIBE

While the large Carnival mas bands, especially the all-inclusive ones, seem to be thriving, hosting elaborate launches and attracting premium corporate sponsors, the small and medium bands don’t fare as well.

President of the Trinidad and Tobago Carnival Bands Association (TTCBA) Rosalind Gabriel, who founded the most successful children’s Carnival mas band, said the small and medium bands struggle to survive and stay alive from one year to another. She said these bands don’t have the resources to properly market themselves, and they also find it difficult to secure major corporate support.

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During the ongoing nationwide lockdown aimed at curbing the spread of Covid-19, various organisations and individuals have answered the call to help the vulnerable and less fortunate in their communities survive the impact of the pandemic.

“A donation from just one person could save up to three lives” – these words are stated on The UWI Blood Donor Foundation’s (UWIBDF) website and have been repeated in blood donor campaigns globally. Yet there is a lack of voluntary blood donors in Trinidad and Tobago. How could that be?

TWENTY years after Ras Shorty I drew his last breath, his legacy lives on. To mark the 20th anniversary of his passing, his children and fans will gather at the Blackman ranch in Piparo, South Trinidad today to pay tribute to the Father of Soca and jamoo music who left an indelible mark on the culture of T&T.

The first time I saw calypsonian/musician/pioneer of soca, Ras Shorty I in person was in 1987. I was walking along Frederick Street in Port of Spain, near Golden Doors Arcade, when he appeared, accompanied by his son, Eldon.