RESOUNDING applause greeted the announcement of the winners of the ground-breaking iGovTT-led hackathon at the highly-anticipated finals and appreciation ceremony of the six-month-long project which took place at the Learning Resource Centre, The University of the West Indies, St Augustine, on September 19.

Members of the three winning teams comprising tertiary level students—Agile Dvlprs, Kaizen Koders and Andros—were all ecstatic to emerge as champions of the innovative initiative which seeks to improve delivery in three critical areas of public service.

“It has been a challenging but enjoyable experience over the past six months. We had to make a lot of sacrifices and go long hours to complete our project. But it was really a labour of love as every member of the team gave 100 per cent. We are all delighted that our final product can make a difference in the lives of people who seek government services,” said beaming ‘hacklete’ Naomi Padmore, a final year student in Electrical and Computer Engineering, The UWI, St Augustine, and member of Agile Dvlprs which created an application to ease the burden faced by commuters.

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