Wild Fowl Trust

Inland from an estuary, where there is more fresh water and plants are thicker, waterfowl, both local and migratory, form an important part of wetland ecosystems, pollinating and distributing many species of swamp vegetation.

Over one hundred and thirty different species of birds migrate to Trinidad and Tobago yearly from North America and over 33 from South America when the Antarctic winter arrives.

Grebes, coots, jacanas, gallinules, herons, smaller marsh birds and many species of wading birds are found, seasonally, or year-round in our swamps and marshes.

Our waterfowl rely on our wetlands for feeding and nesting; while temperate species use them as important migratory stopping-off areas before their long flight home.

For six months of the year these birds become ours and their survival depends on the survival of our wetlands and on us.

The Wild Fowl Trust is an inland freshwater wetland habitat encompassing 26 hectares and two lakes, uniquely situated within a large petrochemical complex in Pointe-a-Pierre on the west coast of Trinidad.

The trust is actively involved in research and captive breeding of endangered waterfowl and other wetland birds for the release and reintroduction into natural wildlife areas.

Many of the 86 species of birds recorded in The Pointe-a-Pierre Wild Fowl Trust breed naturally in forested and lake areas of the trust.

Environmentally education, field and interpretive work and environmental therapy for the differently abled is also a focal point of the trust. Over 19,000 schoolchildren visit yearly.

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