Akhenaton Lewis

Akhenaton Lewis (Yung Bredda)

At just 22 years old, Yung Bredda is one of the most exciting new acts on the local music circuit.

Born Akhenaton Lewis, the multi-genre self-proclaimed “Mr Versatile” has had a major influence on the trending cross-genre sound in T&T and has built an impressive online following. His hybrid dancehall singles “Trampoline” and “Fed Up” racked up millions of views during the past two years.

“I’m a multi-genre entertainer. I don’t just categorise myself and say I’m a soca artiste, or a dancehall artiste or a hip hop or trap artiste. I’m an entertainer. Wherever the music leads me I go. How the music feels is how I react,” a laid-back but cheeky Lewis told the Kitcharee during a WhatsApp exchange.

While most mainstream music acts suffered through the restrictions on gatherings and live performances caused by the pandemic, online personalities like Yung Bredda have thrived through engaging and entertaining a captive social media market. His latest single, a groovy soca titled “Shake” is turning heads on a whole new side of the local musical divide.

“The energy that I put out when they see my lives (online video stream) is the energy that comes from the music. The music leads me and I follow. I get my inspiration from life situations and movies. I have a new thing trending in media now called ‘need for speed’ so I say the ladies in a need for speed. So I’m creative in a whole different way.”

All criticism welcomed

Criticism of his explicit lyrical content is most welcomed, he said. Lewis said while not everyone will agree with his creative choices, he is at peace knowing everything he does “comes from a good place”.

“I can only hope people will receive the music in a good way. But what I can clarify is everything I do I try to do it at my best and in a good way. And that is how I want the people to receive it,” he said.

Lewis, a student of music theory and former trombone player, said he used the downtime of the pandemic to work on new material while staying engaged with his growing fanbase. It has been a taxing process both on time and resources, he revealed. But it is an investment he is sure will bring him big returns.

“Life was hard, but I know in the end when the pandemic is over or we get an ease on this pandemic it would have great rewards. It was hard but yet still I’m having fun doing what I do because I love what I do.

“I’ve been working all through the pandemic so I know it will have great reward. When the place open up next year, God spare life, my job would be easy. It would be to do the same things I’m doing on the live just now on a stage. It will be easier for me because I do enjoy what I’m doing

“Its like you plant a seed and yuh take yuh time and yuh nurture and grow that seed and when the time comes you will reap,” Lewis concluded confidently.

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