People-Rihanna

FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2018 file photo, singer Rihanna arrives at the Fenty Beauty by Rihanna one year anniversary party in New York. Rihanna is suing her father over his use of their last name for a business. In the lawsuit filed Tuesday in federal court in Los Angeles, Rihanna, whose full name is Robyn Rihanna Fenty, alleges that her father Ronald Fenty and his partner have violated her trademark and falsely suggested that their business, Fenty Entertainment, is affiliated with her. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Rihanna is suing her father over his use of their last name for a business.

In the lawsuit filed Tuesday in federal court in Los Angeles, Rihanna, whose full name is Robyn Rihanna Fenty, says that her father, Ronald Fenty, and his partner have violated her trademark and falsely suggested that their business, Fenty Entertainment, is affiliated with her.

The 30-year-old singer says in the lawsuit that she has used the name for her cosmetics brand and other businesses since 2012.

Fenty Entertainment, which advertises itself as a talent and production company, was founded in 2017.

The lawsuit asks the court to order Ronald Fenty to stop using the brand name, and it seeks damages to be determined later.

An email sent to Fenty Entertainment seeking comment wasn't immediately returned.

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