Armed in masks and signs of solidarity, Trinidadians have gathered in the pouring rain to engage in silent protest in front the US Embassy in Port of Spain. Some captured by Express Photographer JERMAINE CRUICKSHANK held umbrellas overhead while socially distanced.

Then protests came following the rise of demonstrations and riots in US cities over the past few weeks following the death of George Floyd in police custody. As the Black Lives Matter movement has gained momentum across the globe, many in the country felt drawn to add to its message.

"We are here in solidarity," said one protestor.

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When you enter the Jeetam family’s home, the first thing you notice are the photos of their son.

In the gallery, a large collage made up of photos of happy moments in his life is pinned to the wall.

On the front door, another photo of the smiling 27-year-old hangs proudly.

In the living room, another life-size photograph of the former Fatima College pupil is positioned just behind the family’s sofa.

He is fairly new on the political block.

But when you speak to him, Symon de Nobriga is a regular type of guy, pleasant, unassuming, down to earth, fun, with an entrepreneurial spirit.

As he makes the transition from a former chairman of the Diego Martin Regional Corporation to Minister in the Office of the Prime Minister with responsibility for Communications, he is in it to learn, to grow, and to do his part in ensuring that the public of Trinidad and Tobago receives information consistently on the decisions and activities of this Government.

There are incidents from the 1970 revolution that many in society still aren’t aware of.

This has caused a contextual gap in the issues of the day.

This was the consensus yesterday as the Bocas Lit Fest continued its online panel discussion with a forum on “The Legacies of 1970—What do the ideas of the Black Power Revolution mean for us today?”