Louis Lee Sing

EYEING ALL 12 SEATS: Former Port of Spain mayor Louis Lee Sing at his Gatacre Street, Woodbrook, office on Friday. —Photo: JERMAINE CRUICKSHANK

Port of Spain is traditionally a People’s National Movement (PNM) stronghold. The party has held the seat since the county council election of 1959 and has controlled the Port of Spain City Corporation for the past 60 years. But former Port of Spain mayor Louis Lee Sing has thrown his hat into the ring and is prepared to battle the party he was once a member of for control of the capital city.

‘Internal bitterness’ Lee Sing had been a member of the PNM for some 50 years, before a bitter parting with the party in 2015. He had cited “internal bitterness and viciousness” for his decision to jump ship. Lee Sing, who served as mayor from 2010 to 2013, now believes he has what it takes to rebuild a “decaying” Port of Spain under his newly-formed party, the Port of Spain People’s Movement (PPM).

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