Lennox Grant

Lennox Grant

IT takes a professional economist such as Vanus James to summon serious attention to the prospect of “industrialised tourism” in characterising a Sandals project in Tobago.

It appears from Dr James’ analysis that Sandals exemplifies “international collaborations”, combining with necessary investments, and raising “quality to global standards”, that could result in “high profit and growth”. At my distance from troubled Tobago tourism, and with my relative innocence about the business, I have defaulted to faith and hope in Sandals as a way to go, Especially so, in the absence of more promising options. Yes, it’s a gut feeling which prompts my conclusion that Tobago needs Sandals more than Sandals needs Tobago. I remain seized of the various disabling effects endured by Tobago tourism, such that Sandals appears on the horizon as a prospect promising like none other.

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

As it prepares to ramp up its communications to counteract vaccine hesitancy, the Ministry of Health’s best chance for success lies in aligning its messaging to the concerns of its target audience.

With the race now on to get vaccines into arms before the more transmissible Delta variant arrives, it might be too late for crafting a scientifically sound public awareness campaign. Nonetheless, a willingness to listen and learn will go a long way in erasing lingering doubts and changing minds.

I have termed Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley and his Finance Minister Colm Imbert the “Diego Martin dinosaurs”, politicians “intellectually fossilised by fossil fuels” who failed to see the global energy revolution threatening the nation’s economy, about which I warned repeatedly for five years.

I got vaccinated last week. I received the first of two doses of the Sinopharm Covid-19 vaccine. I chose the drive-through option at the Ato Boldon Stadium because it is close to my home and I didn’t have to leave the privacy or comfort of my car to queue up at any stage of the proceedings, which is helpful to people who suffer with Parkinson’s and similar neurological disorders.

Once more, the families of seafarers are left to mourn the death of their relatives out at sea. This time the victims are two fishermen who apparently were attacked by pirates.

The incidents of people drowning at sea have become far too prevalent. It is time the authorities make the wearing of life jackets on open vessels mandatory. This would help to save the lives of many people, whether they are fishermen or people on pleasure trips.

Vaccine hesitancy is a delay in acceptance or refusal of vaccines despite the availability of vaccine services.

Vaccine hesitancy is complex and context-specific, varying across time, place and vaccines. It is influenced by factors such as complacency, convenience and confidence.

There is a story about a Samaritan called “good” in the Bible because he did not walk past a suffering Jew. He had no prior relationship with the man lying beaten on the roadside, was not part of his community, yet he acted out of compassion. Giving up his rights and freedom, he helped the man recover and get on with life.