As I listen to the strategic security plans being implemented for Carnival, I cannot help but ponder why is this not the case throughout the year.

Does the average citizen’s life have no value? Is security only a consideration during Carnival because a lot of tourists are coming into the country? As the murder rate continues to soar, what is the safety plan for us citizens living here?

Do we continue playing Russian roulette with our lives, praying to survive another day in this country where crime has become part of the national landscape and everyday conversation?

I recall visiting Venezuela and Colombia during the 1980s when they were experiencing skyrocketing murder rates similar to what we are experiencing now. What was evident was the governments were taking all possible steps to ensure people’s daily safety by deploying the army and police into the streets. It was a bit unnerving at first but it was compulsory at that time considering the state of affairs.

Why are we not deploying the army?

We certainly are not a country that faces any threat of war from external enemies. Do those in power ever consider the citizenry during their turn at governance or do they simply provide the minimum to ensure they slide by to win the next election?

The average citizen refuses to ask pertinent questions such as, where are these guns coming from?

The last time I checked Trinidad and Tobago did not manufacture guns, so where do these guns come from?

Why are so many young women disappearing in this small country, never to be seen again?

Can both questions be linked to our open borders?

Until the citizens start demanding solutions, our lives will continue to be at stake!

We will continue as a nation to be identified as a crime-ridden place, infested by killers, bandits and rapists, a country that is struggling to regain the happiness and safety we once were privileged to enjoy!

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THE International Olympic Committee (IOC) is correct in assessing that it has a “very big communications job” to calm fears over the coronavirus epidemic ahead of this summer’s Games in Tokyo.

IT defies logic how a public service as critical as passport processing should have fallen into such sustained crisis without any attempt by the Government to address the problem.

Friends, citizens, countrymen, police! I am deeply troubled.

The conduct of Hassan Philip Rahaman, a former FCB official; his cousin, Imtiaz Rahaman; his aunt, Alia; their five family businesses, to which some of the 634,588 FIRST shares were sold by Hassan Rahaman; Bourse Brokers Ltd (BBL), a company owned and operated by then-­independent senator Subhas Ramkhelawan, who was at the same time the chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the regulatory entity for the trading/dealings with stocks and shares, needs to be further and more satisfactorily examined. And this, by the police!

Everybody, it seems, has a solution to what he perceives to be wrong with the education system. It is obvious the majority of those who pontificate have taken no time to find out what is really going on in that huge bureaucratic organisation. If they did, they would realise a large part of their solutions are already in place in the schools throughout the nation.

Everybody, it seems, has a solution to what he perceives to be wrong with the education system. It is obvious the majority of those who pontificate have taken no time to find out what is really going on in that huge bureaucratic organisation. If they did, they would realise a large part of their solutions are already in place in the schools throughout the nation.