Prior to the 1990s, the Jamaican business community lived a split life: families in Florida, USA, with a commu­ting businessman. That model did not work—­investment plunged, making the businesses uncompetitive.

By 1992, the Jamaican dollar was reeling, causing much concern about social and economic stability. Butch Stewart then stepped up with the shocking news that he would pump US$1 million a week into the official foreign exchange market at below prevailing rates to stabilise the dollar. A fellow businessman congratulated Stewart for “the new feeling of hope and positive outlook...now being experienced by all of us as Jamaicans”.

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One of the joys of being a T&T citizen is the fact that we have learned over the years to embrace and respect the rich diversity of our people who have come to T&T from many parts of the world—not as empty vessels, but with their different cultures, traditions, religions, languages and so on. This diversity is a source of strength.

THE blight surrounding the compilation and publication of the Foundational History text on Trinidad and Tobago continues, with the discovery of wrong page insertions and numbering in a chapter written by eminent historian Dr James Millette.

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