Raffique Shah

Continuing with the crime crisis, while I accept that the country is not about to collapse under multiple assaults mounted by criminals, we are a nation living in fear—all of us—being another victim, a statistic to be added to the grim numbers that politicians, criminologists and the police churn out to support their respective positions.

AS the heavily armed hardcore criminals consolidate their murderous stranglehold on our country, striking with seeming impunity anytime, anywhere they choose to, the powers-that-be go into the panic mode and respond with fusillades of “gobar” rather than superior strategy and firepower.

IF we think that the Trinidad and Tobago economy is in for another rough ride this year, possibly rougher than what we experienced over the past five years, we should read some of the grim global economic outlooks projected by international agencies such as the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs et al for almost every country in the world.

NO major infrastructural project exposes the huge, costly gap, both in time and money, between the decision to undertake critical public works projects and their implementation and delivery to the populace than the extension of the Solomon Hochoy Highway from San Fernando to Point Fortin.

IMAGINE if you will waking up on New Year’s morning next Wednesday in a Trinidad and Tobago that is a “United, resilient, productive, innovative and prosperous nation (and) a disciplined, caring, fun-loving society comprising healthy, happy and well-educated people built on the enduring attributes of self-reliance, respect, tolerance, equity and integrity in which every citizen has equal opportunities to achieve his/her fullest potential...

AT the beginning of this year, the economic and political crisis that had gripped neighbouring Venezuela from almost a decade earlier exploded on the streets and other public places as hundreds of thousands of people participated in colourful, noisy, and sometimes violent protests, many against, some supportive of, the government of President Nicolas Maduro.

I CONFESS to being somewhat confused when the Minister of National Security Stuart Young and not the Minister of Finance, Colm Imbert, led the charge for the introduction of the new polymer $100 bills on behalf of the Government.

EXACTLY one month before last Monday’s local government elections, I wrote in the space, inter alia: “...The PNM will face the December 2 elections at its most vulnerable point since winning the general election of 2015. 

TRINIDAD and Tobago is not now a failed state as many people claim it is. But it is precariously positioned at critical crossroads where, should the Government and the populace take the wrong path or worse, stay put and do nothing, the country can descend into an abyss that would reduce the economy and the social fabric that has thus far held us together as a model nation to nothingness.

I BREATHED a sigh of relief when I read my Express colleague Mark Wilson’s column last Friday, headlined “Big Sugar, Kamla? Not so sweet”.

View all

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Push notification